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Amazon Aurora March 2019 Update

Released on March 29th, 2019

Restore an Encrypted Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL Database from an Unencrypted Snapshot

You can now restore an encrypted Amazon Aurora with PostgreSQL compatibility cluster from an unencrypted snapshot. You can choose any existing Amazon Key Management Service (KMS) key or create a new key to encrypt your new database.

For more information on creating encrypted Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL databases, read the Amazon Aurora User Guide.

Aurora combines the performance and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. For more information, please visit the Amazon Aurora product page.

Amazon Aurora with PostgreSQL Compatibility Supports Logical Replication

Amazon Aurora with PostgreSQL compatibility now supports logical replication. With logical replication, you can replicate data changes from your Aurora PostgreSQL database to other databases using native PostgreSQL replication slots, or data replication tools such as the AWS Database Migration Service (DMS). Logical replication is supported with Aurora PostgreSQL versions 2.2.0 and 2.2.1, compatible with PostgreSQL 10.6.

To enable logical replication with Aurora PostgreSQL, set up logical replication slots on your instance and stream changes from the database through these slots. This is enabled by setting the parameter rds.logical_replication to 1; you can set this parameter in just a few clicks in the Amazon RDS Management Console. The rds_replication role, assigned to the master user by default, can be used to grant permissions to manipulate and stream data through replication slots. This feature also enables Aurora PostgreSQL to be used as a source for AWS Database Migration Service (DMS). You can learn more about using logical replication with Aurora PostgreSQL in the Aurora documentation.

Aurora combines the performance and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. For more information, please visit the Amazon Aurora product page, and see the AWS Region Table for complete regional availability.

Amazon Aurora with MySQL 5.7 Compatibility Supports GTID-Based Replication

A Global Transaction Identifier (GTID) is a unique identifier created and associated with each transaction committed to a MySQL database. GTIDs are now supported by Amazon Aurora with MySQL 5.7 compatibility, allowing simpler and less error-prone database replication.

Traditional MySQL replication is based on relative coordinates, with each replica keeping track of its position with respect to its current master's binary log files. GTID is based on absolute coordinates, with each transaction having a unique identifier, and each MySQL database server keeping track of which transactions it has already executed.

This provides complete consistency when using binlog replication between an Aurora database and an external MySQL database. Your replication won’t miss transactions or generate conflicts, even after failover or downtime. (Note that replication within an Aurora cluster doesn't use binlog files, so the GTID feature doesn't apply.)

Learn how to take advantage of GTID-based replication from this AWS Database Blog article, and refer to the Amazon Aurora documentation for more information. You can launch an Aurora instance with just a few clicks in the Amazon RDS Management Console.

Aurora combines the performance and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. For more information, please visit the Amazon Aurora product page, and see the AWS Region Table for complete regional availability.

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