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Amazon Aurora February 2019 Update

Released on February 25th, 2019

Amazon Aurora with MySQL Compatibility Supports R5 Instance Types

The MySQL-compatible edition of Amazon Aurora has added support for R5 instances, the next generation of Amazon EC2 memory-optimized instances.

R5 instances are based on the Amazon EC2 Nitro System, a combination of dedicated hardware and a lightweight hypervisor that delivers practically all the compute and memory resources of the host hardware to your database instance. With a 1:8 vCPU to memory ratio, R5 instances are well suited for running memory-intensive database workloads such as transaction processing, data warehousing and analytics. Depending on your workload, you may be able to achieve up to a 70% performance boost as compared to R4 instances.

You can easily create a new R5 instance, or modify your existing Aurora database instance to scale up to R5, in the Amazon RDS Management Console. Please refer to the Amazon Aurora User Guide for more details, and to find out which Aurora versions are supported. For pricing and regional availability, see Amazon Aurora Pricing.

Amazon Aurora combines the performance and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. It provides up to five times better performance than the typical MySQL database, together with increased scalability, durability, and security. For more information, please visit the Amazon Aurora product page.

Amazon Aurora with MySQL Compatibility Supports T3 Instance Types

The MySQL-compatible edition of Amazon Aurora has added support for T3 instances, the next generation of burstable general-purpose instances.

T3 instances provide a baseline level of CPU performance, with the ability to burst CPU usage at any time for as long as required. They offer a balance of compute, memory, and network resources and are ideal for database workloads with moderate CPU usage that experience temporary spikes in use.

When a workload is operating below the baseline threshold, your T3 instance accumulates CPU credits. Each earned CPU credit provides the instance with the opportunity to burst with the performance of a full CPU core for one minute when needed. Amazon Aurora T3 instances are configured for Unlimited Mode, which means they can burst beyond the baseline over a 24-hour window for an additional charge.

You can easily create a new T3 instance, or modify your existing Aurora database instance to scale up to T3, in the Amazon RDS Management Console. Please refer to the Amazon Aurora User Guide for more details, and to find out which Aurora versions are supported. For pricing and regional availability, see Amazon Aurora Pricing.

Amazon Aurora combines the performance and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. It provides up to five times better performance than the typical MySQL database, together with increased scalability, durability, and security. For more information, please visit the Amazon Aurora product page.

Amazon Aurora Serverless Publishes Logs to Amazon CloudWatch

You can now configure Amazon Aurora Serverless (MySQL-compatible edition) to publish general logs, slow query logs, audit logs, and error logs to Amazon CloudWatch Logs.

Publishing these logs to CloudWatch Logs allows you to maintain continuous visibility into database activity, query performance, and errors in your Aurora Serverless databases. For example, you can set up CloudWatch Alarms to notify you on frequent restarts which are recorded in the error log. Similarly, alarms for events recorded in general or audit logs can be created to alert on unwanted changes made to your databases. You may also create alarms to monitor the slow query log and enable timely detection of long-running queries.

CloudWatch Logs provide a durable archive destination for your database logs. You can specify a retention period to indicate how long you want CloudWatch to retain your logs. Additionally, with CloudWatch Logs, you can perform ad hoc searches across multiple logs. This capability is particularly useful for troubleshooting, audits, and log analysis.

Read more about RDS, Aurora and CloudWatch on the AWS Database blog, and refer to the Aurora Serverless documentation for more information. To start publishing logs from Aurora Serverless databases to CloudWatch Logs, visit the Amazon RDS Management Console or download the latest AWS SDK or CLI.

Aurora combines the performance and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. For more information, please visit the Amazon Aurora product page. For pricing and regional availability, see Amazon Aurora Pricing.

Performance Insights Now Supports Counter Metrics on Amazon RDS for MySQL, RDS for PostgreSQL, and Aurora MySQL

Amazon RDS Performance Insights, an advanced database performance monitoring feature that makes it easy to diagnose and solve performance challenges on Amazon RDS databases, now supports additional counter metrics on Amazon RDS for MySQLRDS for PostgreSQL, and Aurora MySQL-compatible edition in addition to Aurora PostgreSQL-compatible edition. With counter metrics, you can customize the Performance Insights dashboard to include up to 10 additional graphs that show a selection from dozens of operating system and database performance metrics. Counter metrics provide additional information that can be correlated with the database load chart to help identify performance issues and analyze performance.

Amazon Aurora screenshot

For example, the above diagram shows how we correlate the transactional commit rate metric with the database load chart to help analyze throughput of the database.

For more information about Amazon RDS Performance Insights, please visit the product page. For regional availability, see the Performance Insights pricing page.

Amazon Aurora with PostgreSQL Compatibility Supports PostgreSQL 10.6

Following the recent announcement of updates to the PostgreSQL database, we have updated Amazon Aurora with PostgreSQL compatibility to support PostgreSQL version 10.6. This release contains fixes to PostgreSQL security vulnerabilities included in the current release from the PostgreSQL community and contains additional bug fixes and improvements.

With this update, a new Restricted Password Management feature is introduced for PostgreSQL 10.6. Using a new parameter and a special role, you can limit database user password changes to members of the role, thereby enabling greater control over password management on the client side (e.g. expiry requirements, complexity requirements).

This release is available in the US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), EU (Ireland), and EU (Frankfurt) regions. For additional release details, see the Release Notes.

Amazon Aurora combines the performance and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. It provides up to three times better performance than the typical PostgreSQL database, together with increased scalability, durability, and security.

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